Ain T I A Woman Annotated Bibliography

Presentation on theme: "Comparison of “Ain’t I a Woman?” by Sojourner Truth and “Independent Women” by Destiny’s Child by Mrs. Warner."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Comparison of “Ain’t I a Woman?” by Sojourner Truth and “Independent Women” by Destiny’s Child by Mrs. Warner

3 Common Theme The speech “Ain’t I a Woman?” by Sojourner Truth and the song “Independent Women” by Destiny’s Child both express that women can be just as powerful as men, and deserve the same rights as men.

4 Example #1 “Ain’t I a Woman?” “ Look at me! Look at my arm! I have ploughed and planted, and gathered into barns, and no man could head me! And ain't I a woman? ” As a slave, Sojourner Truth worked harder and faster than the male slaves.

5 Example #2 “Ain’t I a Woman?” “ Where did your Christ come from? From God and a woman! Man had nothing to do with Him. ” Sojourner Truth shows that God believed women to be strong, even though men of her time doubt her.

6 Example #3 “Independent Women” “ Question: Tell me how you feel about this/Try to control me boy you get dismissed/Pay my own fun, oh and I pay my own bills/Always 50/50 in relationships. ” This quote shows that the women in Destiny ’ s Child work hard to support themselves, and they believe men and women should be equal when it comes to making decisions.

7 Example #4 “Independent Women” “ I worked hard and sacrificed to get what I get/Ladies, it ain't easy bein' independent ” Although being an independent woman is hard work, the women in Destiny ’ s Child feel that it was worth the sacrifice.

8 Conclusion Sojourner Truth’s speech and Destiny’s Child’s song encourage women to stick together and not give up when it comes to women’s rights. Sojourner Truth and the women in Destiny’s Child tell women of their time to be strong and hardworking, despite any obstacles they may face.

9 Works Cited African American Literature. Chicago: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, Inc., 1992 Destiny’s Child: Survivor. Columbia Records. Knowles, B., Barnes, S., Olivier, J., Rooney, C. “Independent Women, Vol. 1.” 2000. Sojourner Truth. Millsaps College, Jackson MS. home.millsaps.edu/mcelvrs/ Sojourner_Truth.jpghome.millsaps.edu/ Survivor. Columbia Records, 2000.

“AIN'T I A WOMEN?” (Copyright  2004)                          
  http://www.crmvet.org/poetry/ftruth.htm

            “Ain’t A Women” was write by Sojourner Truth to share her belief that woman were as equal as men. Her poem questions the idea that “if all the women are black and all the blacks are men” where does the black woman land. Throughout her poem Sojourner compares herself to both a man and an upper class women that both have different privileges than the ones that she receives.
 
Painter , Nell. Sojourner Truth A Life A Symbol
New York: W.W. Norton & Company,Inc, 1996.

            This Sojourner Truth biography talks about Truths experiences as a slave and her journey to become a free woman. The biography a numinous amount of information about Sojourner's life and the challenges as well as amazing experiences she encountered through the journey.  Such as  that her birth was not documented and the year is only assumed 1779 and her birth name was Isabella. 

Fitch , Suzanne Pullon, and Roseanna M. Mandziuk. Sojourner Truth as Orator Wit, Story and Song
Westport, Connecticut, London: GREENWOOD PRESS, 1997

                      This proved me with numinous examples of speeches  that she  deliver through out her life. It also acknowledges the fact that although Sojourner Truth didn't have the ability to read or write she was still remarkably intelligent. 

Stetson, Erlene and David, Linda. Gloring in Tribulation.The  Lifework of Sojourner Truth
East Lansing, Michigan State University Press, 1994
               
                             This piece of work proved me with general information of Sojourner Truths back round coming from slaver and that  the promises that were made and brake by her owner to free her from slavery, thus making her a run away slave. 


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